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Math Colloquium


Date: Friday, November 17, 2017
Time: 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM
Campus: Dayton
Location: Building 1, Room 1-001

Free and open to the public.

Explore connections between reasoning in math and reasoning in science to provide contexts for student knowledge. 

Guest Speaker: Deborah Lan, Ph.D., Ohio State University

Refreshments will be provided.  All students in attendance will be entered in a raffle for Sinclair prizes.  For any questions, please contact David Ericson at 937-512-3915 or david.ericson@sinclair.edu.

Abstract: In this study, students’ reasoning skills are explored through the Lawson Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (LCTSR). The scales on this measure are correlated with specific skills in science and math thinking. Correlations among these scales are discussed with respect to applying math to the context of science. In follow-up interviews with a sub-group of student participants, findings were that students tended to be data-oriented, concrete thinkers. Weaknesses with respect to mathematic reasoning indicates that learning math is parallel to developing a new skill. This study presents on the implications of teaching math in the abstract to concrete thinkers and the importance of cross-discipline collaboration in helping students develop skills associated with understanding math and science.

Math Colloquium


Date: Friday, November 17, 2017
Time: 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM
Campus: Dayton
Location: Building 1, Room 1-001

Free and open to the public.

Explore connections between reasoning in math and reasoning in science to provide contexts for student knowledge. 

Guest Speaker: Deborah Lan, Ph.D., Ohio State University

Refreshments will be provided.  All students in attendance will be entered in a raffle for Sinclair prizes.  For any questions, please contact David Ericson at 937-512-3915 or david.ericson@sinclair.edu.

Abstract: In this study, students’ reasoning skills are explored through the Lawson Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (LCTSR). The scales on this measure are correlated with specific skills in science and math thinking. Correlations among these scales are discussed with respect to applying math to the context of science. In follow-up interviews with a sub-group of student participants, findings were that students tended to be data-oriented, concrete thinkers. Weaknesses with respect to mathematic reasoning indicates that learning math is parallel to developing a new skill. This study presents on the implications of teaching math in the abstract to concrete thinkers and the importance of cross-discipline collaboration in helping students develop skills associated with understanding math and science.