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Mathematics Department Colloquium


Date: Friday, November 2, 2018
Time: 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM
Campus: Dayton
Location: Building 1, Room 1-001

The topic for the Fall Semester Mathematics Colloquium will be Methods of Appointment, presented by David Hare, professor at Sinclair Community College. This presentation is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be provided, and all students in attendance will be entered in a raffle for Sinclair prizes.

Abstract: In Article 1 Section 2 of the Constitution of the United States we find the following: "Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers..." That statement sounds simple enough; however, debate has raged for over 225 years regarding how best to carry out the "apportionment". In this talk we will investigate various methods of apportionment (the process of dividing discrete objects among various groups) and the reasons why no perfect method has been found.

If you have any questions, or if you are interested in speaking at a future Colloquium, please contact David Ericson at 937-512-3915 or david.ericson@sinclair.edu.

Mathematics Department Colloquium


Date: Friday, November 2, 2018
Time: 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM
Campus: Dayton
Location: Building 1, Room 1-001

The topic for the Fall Semester Mathematics Colloquium will be Methods of Appointment, presented by David Hare, professor at Sinclair Community College. This presentation is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be provided, and all students in attendance will be entered in a raffle for Sinclair prizes.

Abstract: In Article 1 Section 2 of the Constitution of the United States we find the following: "Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers..." That statement sounds simple enough; however, debate has raged for over 225 years regarding how best to carry out the "apportionment". In this talk we will investigate various methods of apportionment (the process of dividing discrete objects among various groups) and the reasons why no perfect method has been found.

If you have any questions, or if you are interested in speaking at a future Colloquium, please contact David Ericson at 937-512-3915 or david.ericson@sinclair.edu.